Daylight Saving Cluster Headaches

Daylight Saving is a doozy. The number of traffic incidents increases. People get cantankerous. It’s harder to wake up and get going in the morning. And it f****s with your circadian rhythm. The effects of this can last for a very long time. It is like a form of jet lag, only you haven’t traveled anywhere, you’ve just had a societally imposed time changed forced onto you. However, most people don’t have the luxury of taking a day or a few days off to allow for their bodies to adjust to the changes in both time and the body’s circadian rhythm. I had gotten into a very good self-care groove before daylight saving hit. Afterward, I began having a series of terrible headaches even though I knew I had been making consistent efforts to meditate, stay hydrated, and eat well. Some people would talk to me about how my day was going or how I was feeling and I didn’t have a whole lot of good things to say about my well-being. Some people looked at me quizzically when I told them, “It’s just my circadian rhythm.” Your body’s circadian rhythm regulates your hormones, metabolism, blood flow, neurochemicals, and essentially the rhythms of your body’s ecosystem.

So, if you can’t take a day or few days off, what can you do to offset the effects of daylight saving? You may need to employ a few tactics that feel a little bit odd. You may need to take a break from work and spend 15 minutes napping in your car or book a conference room where you can have the blinds down to take time for yourself. You may need to take a sick day if you are prone to migraines, tension headaches, and develop cluster headaches. I took a day off after staving it off for a while thinking I could fight through it, only finding that it was getting increasingly worse. Employ all of the self-care practices in your arsenal. Meditate. Drink plenty of water, eat a rainbow of fruits and vegetables and food that makes you happy. Laugh plenty. Give yourself a blue light power-down before bed and do not allow yourself to be exposed to blue light from devices or screens for at least 30 minutes after you wake up. Take naps whenever possible. Take supplements like CBD, astaxanthin, and coenzyme 10 if you are prone to migraines and headaches. Take a Himalayan salt bath. Key thing to do is simply chill. Be kind to yourself.

Resources:
Can daylight savings give you a headache?
Daylight saving time ending can trigger severe headaches
5 Weird Effects of Daylight Saving Time


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